Category Archives: Science Education

Pope Francis and the Magic Wand

Pope Francis has been in the news for the past few days. The pontiff has a habit of saying what he’s thinking and he sometimes does this at surprising venues. This time he was speaking at the unveiling of a … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Philosophy, Religion, Science Education | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Those who can’t, teach…

Today, September 25, would be the 171st birthday of Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin. A discouraging character to honour. Born in 1843, by 1900 his ideas about science education and the scientific method came to dominate American science. Not all of his … Continue reading

Posted in Non-drift Theories, Philosophy, Science Education | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Popular, but Wrong

We don’t usually celebrate a man’s death, and we are not doing that here. But William Matthew (1871-1930) died on this date in 1930, and his appearance on my geo-calendar was a reminder to me to think about this popular … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, History, Non-drift Theories, Science Education | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A Cultural Backlash

There seems to be a cultural backlash against science. Some of my liberal friends blame science for the evils of neonicotinoids, GMOs, and vaccines. They are wrong, of course. My conservative friends decry science for promoting Darwinism, the Earth’s real … Continue reading

Posted in History, Philosophy, Religion, Science Education | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Conspiracies are Everywhere

Bison, anticipating a massive volcanic eruption, seen fleeing Yellowstone. Yellowstone National Park sits atop the world’s largest supervolcano.  The accompanying caldera will one day tip its hat and obliterate half of the American states. Or maybe not. This blog entry … Continue reading

Posted in Science Education | Tagged , | Leave a comment

It’s different

Convicted of forgery, American attorney Amos Eaton spent five years in prison. Released at age 40, his law career ruined, and still protesting his innocence, he moved on. That was in 1815. Geology became his greatest interest and teaching was … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, How Geophysics Works, Philosophy, Science Education | Tagged | Leave a comment